The Living Clocks – Are Humans and Living Organisms Synchronizing Life?

The brain can read these patterns and learn them. In this way, we can time music or specific tasks to be performed, for example, one second after a signal. Even though not all the clock mechanisms in humans are known, biological clocks share a property with all human-built and non-living clocks: they are limited by quantum mechanics. Even the simple pendulum is limited by quantum theory.

Deconstructing Schrödinger's cat

The paradox of Schrödinger’s cat—the feline that is, famously, both alive and dead until its box is opened—is the most widely known example of a recurrent problem in quantum mechanics: its dynamics seem to predict that macroscopic objects (like cats) can, sometimes, exist simultaneously in more than one completely distinct state. Many physicists have tried to solve this paradox over the years, but no approach has been universally accepted. Now, however, theoretical physicist Franck Laloë from Laboratoire Kastler Brossel (ENS-Université PSL) in Paris has proposed a new interpretation that could explain many features of the paradox. He sets out a model of this possible theory in a new paper in EPJ D.

Antigravity | Breaking the Law of Gravity

A few years ago, while testing a superconducting ceramic disc by rotating it above powerful electromagnets, Podkletnov noticed something extremely strange. Small objects above the disc seemed to lose weight, as if they were being shielded from the pull of Planet Earth. The weight reduction was small – around 2 percent – but nothing like this had ever been observed before. If the shielding effect could be refined and intensified, the implications would be immense. In fact, practical, affordable gravity nullification could change our lives more radically than the invention of the internal combustion engine.

Explainer: Quarks

epa01482465 (FILE) A press photographer takes a picture of the magnet core of the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet (CMS, Compact Muon Solenoid) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)'s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particule accelerator, Geneva, Switzerland, 22 March 2007. The world's most powerful particle accelerator will be launched 10 September 2008. The scientists hope the accelerator would unravel secrets of the universe, including what is the dark matter and why there is more matter than antimatter. EPA/MARTIAL TREZZINI

Physicists today believe that matter is made up of twelve fundamental particles – quarks and leptons – that have no substructure and cannot be broken down into smaller particles. Quarks and leptons interact via four forces to make the universe we know today.