The Living Clocks – Are Humans and Living Organisms Synchronizing Life?

The brain can read these patterns and learn them. In this way, we can time music or specific tasks to be performed, for example, one second after a signal. Even though not all the clock mechanisms in humans are known, biological clocks share a property with all human-built and non-living clocks: they are limited by quantum mechanics. Even the simple pendulum is limited by quantum theory.

The Story of Rockets (Part-1) : How we got to Moon

It was 1919. Robert Goddard had released his research paper titled – “A Method of Reaching Extreme Altitudes”. In this paper, he had claimed that a liquid powered rocket had enough potential to take objects along with it to space, and go as far as the moon. The New York Times, on 13th January 1920,… Continue reading The Story of Rockets (Part-1) : How we got to Moon

Nasa shortlists four astrophysics missions for 2025 launch

The Andromeda galaxy, the nearest spiral galaxy to the Milky Way.

NASA has shortlisted four proposals for its next astrophysics missions, due for launch in 2025. The agency has funding to fly two of them, and the four will now each receive funds for a nine-month period of technical study. The two missions will be chosen next year.

Deconstructing Schrödinger's cat

The paradox of Schrödinger’s cat—the feline that is, famously, both alive and dead until its box is opened—is the most widely known example of a recurrent problem in quantum mechanics: its dynamics seem to predict that macroscopic objects (like cats) can, sometimes, exist simultaneously in more than one completely distinct state. Many physicists have tried to solve this paradox over the years, but no approach has been universally accepted. Now, however, theoretical physicist Franck Laloë from Laboratoire Kastler Brossel (ENS-Université PSL) in Paris has proposed a new interpretation that could explain many features of the paradox. He sets out a model of this possible theory in a new paper in EPJ D.

The Millennium Definitions Of Physics

Look at what happens around us. A child who smiles, a nightingale that sings, an ily that opens: all move. Every shadow, even an immobile one, is due to moving light.
Every mountain is kept in place by moving electrons. Every star owes its formation and its shine to motion of matter and radiation. Also, the darkness of the night sky* is due to motion: it results from the expansion of space.