Sourav Ghosh

Zeno's Paradox: Would Physics be able to solve it?

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10 mins read

Zeno of Elea (c. 495 – c. 430 BC) was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher of Magna Graecia and a member of the Eleactic School founded by Parmenides. Aristotle called him the inventor of the dialectic He is best known for his Paradoxes, which Bertrand Russell described as "immeasurably subtle and profound".

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Researchers explore Quantum Computing to possibly discover COVID-19 treatments

2 mins read

Quantum Computing is no doubt an emerging field, which combines both Quantum Mechanics and Machine Learning. However, no one would have ever imagined that such a field, which probably has no connection to medicine, is being used to find treatment methods of COVID-19 virus. Pennsylvania State University Researchers led by Swaroop Ghosh, the Joseph R. and Janice M. Monkowski Career Development Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Engineering believe that this method could find a drug much quickly. The funding from Penn State Huck Institutes of Life Sciences is supporting their work.

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Deconstructing Schrödinger's cat

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2 mins read

The paradox of Schrödinger's cat—the feline that is, famously, both alive and dead until its box is opened—is the most widely known example of a recurrent problem in quantum mechanics: its dynamics seem to predict that macroscopic objects (like cats) can, sometimes, exist simultaneously in more than one completely distinct state. Many physicists have tried to solve this paradox over the years, but no approach has been universally accepted. Now, however, theoretical physicist Franck Laloë from Laboratoire Kastler Brossel (ENS-Université PSL) in Paris has proposed a new interpretation that could explain many features of the paradox. He sets out a model of this possible theory in a new paper in EPJ D.

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Image: 'Pale Blue Dot' revisited

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5 mins read

The picture, named "The Pale Blue Dot" was obtained on 14th February, 1990, moments before the camera and the several other instruments of the Voyager were powered off for conservation of battery, since the probe wouldn't make a close flyby past any other objects during their lifetime.

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